Frequently Asked Questions - Historic Environment

See below for frequently asked questions. Please note this content is a work in progress and will be added to constantly.

For owners of thatched buildings:

Do I need Listed Building Consent to repair or re-thatch my listed building? 

For repairs in the same thatching material, Listed Building Consent is not required. For large scale re-thatching or a change in roof form, such as ridge style, or type of thatching material, then Listed Building Consent is probably required.

For further advice, have a look at the Thatch LBC applications document which is attached below. 

For Prospective Purchasers:

I am buying a listed building – what can I alter?

We are not resourced sufficiently to give individual advice to prospective purchasers as you all want to change the building in different ways. The following is therefore general advice and is given without prejudice and cannot bind the Council to any particular course of action.

We always advise you to buy on the understanding that you have to be satisfied with living in the property should listed building consent be refused for your proposed alterations. The SPAB leaflet 'Look before you Leap' would probably be most helpful to you.

In addition your listed building consent and planning permission applications will be measured against local policies HE14, HE4 and HE5 of the Winchester District Local Plan Review adopted 2006, Government policy NPPF (National Policy Planning Framework 2012) specifically Section 12 “Conserving and enhancing the historic environment” and CP20 of Winchester Local Plan Part 1 Joint Core Strategy and retained policy HE1.

I hope this is helpful for you and good luck with your purchase. Further advice on repairs, maintenance and alterations to a listed building or an unlisted building in a conservation area may be found online on the Heritage and Conservation pages but formal pre-application advice can only be given when you have completed your purchase of a property.

What is the best way to insulate my historic building?

Historic England have just updated a number of their Guidance documents for how to care for and repair historic buildings.
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Insulating dormer windows
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Insulating flat roofs
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Insulating pitched roofs at ceiling level
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Insulating solid ground floors
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Insulating solid walls
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Insulating thatched roofs
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Insulation of suspended timber floors
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Open fires, chimneys and flues
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Secondary glazing for windows
• Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Draught proofing windows and doors

Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: Early cavity walls